Southern Africa - Resources

Martha Tholana
Martha Tholanah's digital story created during "Telling Our Stories," a JASS digital storytelling workshop held at Women's Net in Johannesburg, South Africa, May 21-25th, 2008. Part of JASS' Feminist Movement Building Initiative in Southern Africa
Hope Chigudu
Women living with HIV who are leaders in the AIDS movement in their communities in Malawi came together for the start of a four-day workshop organized by JASS. They started by creating startling and beautiful body maps. They did it without any artists to help. In groups of five, the women started by outlining their bodies on large sheets of paper. Each woman was drawn by the other women in the group. People stayed in their small groups to do this, sharing magic markers and other art materials. Through a series of imaginative exercises they added parts to the outline of their bodies.
JASS (Just Associates)
JASS Southern Africa is building the leadership and organizing capacity of Malawian women to pressure local and national government to make development resources accessible and to deliver on laws that supportwomen and HIV‐positive people. By organizing the power of their numbers, women can make their voices heard in order to confront stigma, increase access to healthcare, and improve basic livelihoods.
Lisa VeneKlasen
This session, which uses the JASS Southern Africa framework and video as it’s core outline, will look at HIV/AIDS from the lens of power and inequality in order to define the many ways that this urgent challenge facing women presents opportunities for movement-building and energizing women's rights agendas.
Patience Mandishona & Martha Tholanah
Organizing in Zimbabwe has been challenging, even dangerous, for some years. As the country’s economic crisis has deepened – with measurable inflation reaching 79,600,000,000% monthly and 98% daily in November 2008 – activists have had to pit themselves against repressive laws and actions such as Operation Murambatsvina, a wave of brutal urban clearance, beginning in 2005 and repeated since, that has affected an estimated 2.4 million Zimbabweans.
Emira Woods and Lisa VeneKlasen
An op-ed written by Lisa VeneKlasen and JASS board member, Emira Woods, on the election of Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf as President of Liberia.

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